While green beauty focuses on protecting the environment, blue beauty stems from the need to address and correct the ways the industry’s products are harming our oceans.

“From sourcing ingredients to responsible packaging, industry leaders who were once considered ‘green’ are now making a concerted effort to become ‘blue’. It certainly resonates with sustainability and the ethical expectations of consumers. With the oceans covering over 70% of the Earth’s surface, it’s no surprise that future leaders are advocating their protection, ” explained Krutika Sen, head of business affairs at Australian biotech firm Marinova.

She said the trend, although global, is spreading rapidly in the APAC region, as evidenced by further research into the potential of ingredients derived from the sea.

The Australian government and leading research institutes, for example, are actively studying the potential of marine algae.

With more scientific backing, Sen believes these ingredients from the region will gain more industry attention.

“We expect this to continue in the future and that the demand for products from very clean ocean waters, such as those in Australia and New Zealand, will continue to increase.”In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Additionally, due to the historical use of seaweed in many Asian cultures, the company expects seaweed to be in high demand for APAC brands.

“We tend to see APAC brands very open to incorporating seaweed extracts into their products. They are already aware of the many therapeutic benefits offered by certain algae and their bioactive compounds and wish to adopt new scientific evidence as it emerges.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

As the blue beauty model emphasizes the entire supply chain, Sen expects it to put sustainable and ethical sourcing under the microscope.

The company, for example, sources only wild macroalgae and practices manual harvesting.

“We do not source – and will not source – algae that has been cultivated or cultivated in parts of the world prone to industrial or human contamination or where environmentally sustainable harvesting practices cannot be guaranteed,” said the senator

Marinova believes she is well positioned to harness this new wave of beauty with her marine ingredients.

“The core values ​​of the blue beauty movement align well with vendors like Marinova. The ingredients we produce are a perfect fit for the blue beauty model and are increasingly being incorporated into a range of topical skin care applications. These are ingredients that tick all the boxes – from the sustainable and ethical sourcing of the raw material to a comprehensive case of scientific evidence to support it. “In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Water: the real luxury

Besides the ingredients, the blue beauty movement is also concerned about the waste of water, which has led to innovative new formulas that help in the conservation of water as a natural resource.

Waterless products also save the planet from harmful emissions – water adds bulk and weight to a product, increasing the number of vehicles to transport. In addition, reconstituted products create less waste because less water equals less packaging.

In recent years, the waterless beauty trend has gained traction in the market with independent brands like Bhuman playing an important role in promoting the concept.

Launched in 2019, Bhuman is an eco-beauty brand from Singapore that offers a 100% waterless facial cleanser that contains a herbal enzyme powder that activates with water.

Originally from one of the most water-stressed countries in the world, the brand is very aware of the urgent problem of water scarcity.

“Water is such a neglected commodity. It is a very precious commodity that will become even more scarce in many parts of the world, either because of climate change or because of our rapid use of water ”,said Lee Yeeli, founder of Bhuman.

She clarified: “[Water] is just not priced correctly. Let’s look at plastic – it takes pennies to make because plastic pellets are so cheap, but it will take us 400 years to biodegrade. We just don’t rate it properly which is why everything is plastic. It is the same with water.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Waterless products also save the planet from harmful emissions – water adds bulk and weight to a product, increasing the number of vehicles to transport. In addition, reconstituted products create less waste because less water equals less packaging.

While awareness of blue beauty is not as widespread as green beauty or clean beauty in Asia, Lee is optimistic about the movement’s rapid growth.

“I think it’s a very new term for most people, including myself, it’s new terminology that I’m taking over in the market. But I feel it is increasing. I used to think that not everything really cares, but no, I see a lot of sustainability activity and talk, not just among zero waste, but among everyone.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

She added that this has accelerated in part because of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has undoubtedly changed consumption habits in the long term.

“I think COVID-19 is teaching us that we have too much of a mess in our lives. Because we live in smaller spaces, you can’t run away from the fact that your house is cluttered. Our consumption patterns are starting to change. So, surprisingly, we are seeing a huge increase in the simply conscious consumption and demand for our type of beauty products – something more considered.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

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