Legacy beauty brands typically take decades to achieve a level of market dominance that sees them seep into popular consciousness.

Several have succeeded; brands whose names will be recognizable even by people whose involvement in the beauty industry is limited to toothpaste, soap and dandruff shampoo.

You know them, as the brand that has become synonymous with luxury skincare, La Mer. Although the beauty industry may have a fluffy exterior, it is a particularly lucrative market, but saturated and intensely competitive.

New businesses trying to carve out a niche and build a reputation face giants with marketing budgets commensurate with their status, and most new brands fail in their first year.

The results were amazing. Skin grafting was avoided. Scars were avoided

The global skin care market alone was valued at over $ 145 billion in 2020. While it has certainly flourished and penetrated popular notoriety as a symbol of high quality skin care, the brand luxury Augustinus Bader – with its royal blue bottles now recognizable around the world – was only launched in 2018.

While existing brands offer lines comprising hundreds of products designed to be used synchronously in complex diets, the new name in premium skin care was launched with just two products: cream, for oily skin and balanced, and rich cream for dry skin. Three years ago, at the height of Korean-inspired multi-layered skincare routines, this was a one-off product declaring itself everything everyone needed.

In an interview, Gwyneth Paltrow said she uses the rich cream at night, and countless celebrity mentions have followed. The brand has become the talking point of beauty editors around the world, winning countless awards.

Among others, actresses Courtney Cox and Melanie Griffiths have invested in the company. Since that launch, Augustinus Bader has experienced almost unprecedented growth, surpassing its historic competitors to become one of the most recognizable names in luxury skin care in three years. Sales of £ 7million in 2018 climbed to £ 70million last year and continue to grow.

Bader himself is Director and Professor of Applied Stem Cell Biology and Cellular Technology at the University of Leipzig. He has the kind of sweet and courteous manner and a propensity for bow ties that feels like another time but is especially new to the extraversion of the beauty industry. He almost seems to have lost his way on his way to a medical conference and has just created one of the most renowned beauty products in the world.

The founders of Augustinus Bader, German stem cell expert Professor Augustinus Bader and French financier Charles Rosier.

One of the world’s leading stem cell experts, the 62-year-old German professor has created a wound gel designed for use on burn victims. It rehabilitates the skin with minimal scarring and without the need for skin grafts. Creating a high-end skin cream that sells to Brown Thomas for just under $ 200 a bottle was not his intended career path, and it remains secondary to his research, which he’s always excited to discuss.

When I talk about the success of the brand that bears his name, Bader displays a reserved, almost timid delight. He says that at the start of his research, his alternative to organ transplantation and skin grafting was widely rejected.

“My controversial idea might have been a bit early, but now with skin care, although it’s not a form of medical treatment, they share a common idea: that you can trigger or help your own relief. Ten percent of the brand’s net sales went to wound healing research and other charities in 2020.

Bader met French financier Charles Rosier at a dinner in Leipzig and showed Rosier pictures of the effect of his wound gel on a four-year-old girl who had suffered second and third degree burns. “I was amazed by the images,” says Rosier.

Rosier says customer feedback is so enthusiastic and forthcoming that the brand is creating products based on demand

“The results were incredible. Skin grafting was avoided. Scars were avoided. I thought “How can such a discovery exist and it is not widely available?” It would change the lives of so many people. This would have a major positive impact. Rosier’s answer to his own question is not edifying – “most burn victims come from developing countries, because that is where fire is used to cook and heat homes.”

Funding for clinical trials costs tens of millions and as a result, Rosier suggests that investing that kind of money in Bader’s wound gel would be “risky funding with perhaps less return for the pharmaceutical companies.” When they met that night, Bader hadn’t gotten the funding he needed.

With no experience in the beauty industry, but with a background in finance, Rosier says he and Bader thought about how they could use the professor’s findings to “find a pragmatic way to fund his research.”

Rosier attributes the couple’s initial enthusiasm to naivety. He believed that the professor’s scientific credentials were unmatched. He considered Bader’s TFC8 complex to be unique enough to establish a niche in the beauty industry and lead a brand to major success. The professor describes TFC8 as a combination of certain “vitamins, fats, nutrients and amino acids which are precursors of our intact skin cells in our intact skin” which are necessary for the skin to repair itself.

Despite the original ethics of just one branded product, last year it launched numerous products in the face and body category and is about to launch Augustinus Bader The Serum (€ 320) and Augustinus Bader The Eye. Cream (185 €). Bader himself confirms that “our philosophy remains that all products are stand-alone products. There are different formulations because people have different skin needs – rich cream, for example, may be better if you live in a dry climate or have drier skin.

He is not suggesting that people should buy all the products and use them simultaneously. They all contain its TFC8 complex. Rosier says customer feedback is so enthusiastic and forthcoming that the brand is creating products based on demand.

“If you look at Augustinus Bader’s peers in the premium skin care world, they average 150-200 product lines. We won’t. It’s not our DNA. We always maintain this philosophy of simplicity, and the product line is a very neat assortment compared to our peers. “

So far, the brand has gained prominence by doing things differently. It will be interesting to see if he continues to win with this strategy.


Recommended Posts

No comment yet, add your voice below!


Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.